Hybrid Arts Lab: Rapid Fire Text

Image
Rapid Fire Text header image
September 12 - September 30, 2020
12:00AM - 11:59PM
Location
Online @ UAS From Home

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2020-09-12 00:00:00 2020-09-30 23:59:00 Hybrid Arts Lab: Rapid Fire Text   Rapid Fire Text is the result of an improvisational ink workshop facilitated by Lori Esposito, P.h.D candidate in the Dept of Arts Administration, Education and Policy with her class “Visual Culture: Investigating Diversity & Social Justice.” Taking inspiration from poetry, jazz, and graffiti, this rhythmic drawing approach merges the expressive potentials of ink with the written word. “Rapid” implies speed, quickness of movement and thought. “Fire” calls to attention the potential power and explosiveness of speech and the written word. Rapid Fire Text acknowledges forces that can manipulate, elevate, sensor, or silence. Harnessing this ancient fluid media (ink), students become familiar with how duration and speed can function as tools for developing their writing, self-representation, and expression within a classroom community.   The images seen in this exhibition were created during the workshops.    About the “Rapid Fire” Improvisational Ink Workshop Though a series of durational works, students practice syncing their physical movement of painting with the pace of their thinking. By the completion of the event, their drawing surface is saturated with layers of calligraphic text. These surfaces may be excavated for meaning or remain semi-illegible. The materiality and viscerality of ink may be interpreted as expressive marks or it may deliver more nuanced messages as does the written word. The improvisational ink workshop experiments with an alternative platform for developing material-led thinking processes that foster meaningful in-class discussion. The student is invited to apply various durations (1 minute to 3 minutes) to structure their thinking processes. The event facilitator introduces the materials and provides durational prompts. Students are asked to express themselves through the materials and express their culture and identity as pertinent to the context of the course (ARTEDUC 2367—Visual Culture: Investigating Diversity & Social Justice). Online @ UAS From Home Urban Arts Space uas@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

 

Rapid Fire Text is the result of an improvisational ink workshop facilitated by Lori Esposito, P.h.D candidate in the Dept of Arts Administration, Education and Policy with her class “Visual Culture: Investigating Diversity & Social Justice.” Taking inspiration from poetry, jazz, and graffiti, this rhythmic drawing approach merges the expressive potentials of ink with the written word. “Rapid” implies speed, quickness of movement and thought. “Fire” calls to attention the potential power and explosiveness of speech and the written word. Rapid Fire Text acknowledges forces that can manipulate, elevate, sensor, or silence. Harnessing this ancient fluid media (ink), students become familiar with how duration and speed can function as tools for developing their writing, self-representation, and expression within a classroom community.

 

The images seen in this exhibition were created during the workshops. 

 

About the “Rapid Fire” Improvisational Ink Workshop

Though a series of durational works, students practice syncing their physical movement of painting with the pace of their thinking. By the completion of the event, their drawing surface is saturated with layers of calligraphic text. These surfaces may be excavated for meaning or remain semi-illegible. The materiality and viscerality of ink may be interpreted as expressive marks or it may deliver more nuanced messages as does the written word.

The improvisational ink workshop experiments with an alternative platform for developing material-led thinking processes that foster meaningful in-class discussion. The student is invited to apply various durations (1 minute to 3 minutes) to structure their thinking processes. The event facilitator introduces the materials and provides durational prompts. Students are asked to express themselves through the materials and express their culture and identity as pertinent to the context of the course (ARTEDUC 2367—Visual Culture: Investigating Diversity & Social Justice).

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